FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

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FAQs

Yes, particularly for low back pain. The Clinical Standards Advisory Group recommended in 19941 that there should be earlier access to the manipulative therapies and a redistribution of resources within the NHS to make this happen. In September 1996 the Royal College of General Practitioners issued guidelines for GPs which recommend manipulative treatment within the first six weeks for patients with low back pain. They also state that the risks of manipulation are very low in skilled hands.

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Yes. You cannot properly control a manipulation to yourself and your relief may only be temporary. You are more likely to be ‘cracking’ the wrong joint, since movement in the affected one will be restricted. Consult your chiropractor!

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Your chiropractor has treated you, so allowing your body to heal, but if you have to continue the lifestyle which caused the original condition, your chiropractor may recommend regular check-ups or treatment.

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Chiropractic is remarkably safe when treatment is carried out by a properly qualified practitioner. Your chiropractor is trained to recognise conditions which require referral elsewhere, and can treat you even after surgery.

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It takes at least four years of full-time study to become a chiropractor at the Anglo-European College of Chiropractic (AECC) which offers a course leading to an MSc degree, or the University of Clamorgan, which offers a BSc (Hons) degree. The University of Surrey runs a two-year MSc course. The courses are followed by a postgraduate year spent on the British Chiropractic Associations’s Vocational Training Scheme (VTS), which students spend in a chiropractic clinic with the support of a qualified Trainer. Upon successful completion of the VTS the student is awarded the Diploma in Chiropractic (DC). Only chiropractors trained at an accredited college can become members of the British Chiropractic Association (BCA), the largest association for the profession in the UK, established since 1925, and now representing over 800 UK chiropractors.

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There are differences in technique and approach, as well as some similarities. The important factor is that the practitioner is well-qualified. Both professions now have statutory regulation.

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Yes. The strength of chiropractic is that it can help prevent discomfort, pain and even disease, and is suitable for everyone. It is entirely appropriate to visit a chiropractor even if you have no pain, as restrictions in movement can often be detected before symptoms appear, just as regular visits to the dentist can help to prevent toothache.

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No. Your treatment programme will be tailored to your specific needs.

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Manipulation, when carried out correctly by a qualified practitioner, is not painful. If you have acute muscle spasm, when even the lightest touch hurts, there may be some discomfort. Sometimes, if you have had the problem for some time, you may feel sore whilst your body starts to adjust. You chiropractor will tell you if this is likely to happen.

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These are common, general terms used to describe a multitude of conditions. Your chiropractor will make more specific diagnosis and explain your condition to you.

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When the two surfaces of a joint are moved apart rapidly, as happens in a chiropractic adjustment, there is a change of pressure within the joint space. This may sometimes cause a buggle of gas to ‘pop’ – but this sound is not significant, and does not hurt.

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An average course of treatment may entail five or six visits over two or three weeks, but evey case is assessed individually, and it is important to keep your appointments, and make regular visits. Discuss this with your chiropractor, who will explain your treatment programme to you.

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Your recovery is depentent on many factors – the problem, the lenght of time you have had it and your own commitment to any rehabilitative excersises and maintenance visits which your doctor may recommend.

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Some GPs are able to purchase chiropractic treatment for their patients on the NHS. Many health insurance companies will now pay for chiropractic treatment

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Increasingly, GPs are recognising chiropractic as an effective compementary treatment, particularly for back pain. You do not need a GP’s referral to visit a chiropractor.

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The first consultation takes, on average, about half an hour, and a treatment session about 15 minutes.

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